Salaam Alekum, Bastard

release date: 30/1/95

Here's what Richard Gehr wrote about Muslimgauze for the Village Voice, November 22, 1994

"While Muslimgauze's beautiful, frequently Koran-inspired packaging and exacerbating titles smack of pure political agenda, the music itself aspires to timeless, utopian peace. You can float or fly through this stuff, let it loft you gently into the upper atmosphere or pursue its dragon tails into imaginary Medinas. Sculpted from keyboards and electronics, a variety of international drums, and voices and sound effects snagged from Allah knows where, Muslimgauze's output bears affinity to ambient music that claims the decidedly different psychic terrain of such titles as 'Eternal Drift', 'Path of Harmony' and 'Sunangel Summer'. Reducing Muslimgauze to mere ambience does no justice to Jones' obsessions. Where ambient wants to chill you out with it's lazy, looping beats, Muslimgauze's hot pulse aims to sweep listeners into significant, albeit imaginary, liberationist solidarity."

Dedicated to the invisible hands of revenge.

Press release from Soleilmoon.

The Following appeared in NHZ Magazine.

You will once again succumb to those hypnotic and shimmering breathes that whirl into electronic sound volutes. You will let yourself undulate to the rhythm of the horde of percussions. You will be gasping for breath when the moment of restrained rage come. High, you will finally find yourself in the shade of minarets, lost in a crowded bazaar where rumours and resentments rustle. Here, the music of the stones, traces of an eternal past, reveals itself.

review by Nicolas Prevel
NHZ Magazine (April, 1995)

The following appeared in Noise From The Spleens Of Space.

Well, here it is, the semi-weekly Muslimgauze review. I know this disc is a little dated now, but I just got it, so suffer. This release actually came as something of a surprise to me...it's pretty violent, by Muslimgauze standards. At least, with the opening and closing "Salaam Alekum.." tracks, you get an industrial-percussion feel and a tense weave of eastern hums, and speaking of tense - "Hebron Massacre" is here re-presented as a short mix - 12 minutes of building pressure and unreleased aggression.. it retains the feel of the original but it seems a bit hurried. "Dome of the Rock" and "Mandarin Guerilla" both flow into an almost-ambient area, "Mandarin" especially so, with it's 'Arabs in spaaaace' echoey drones and buzzing synth. "Cairopraktar" has a percussive feel more akin to "Citadel" or some of the remixes on "Infidel". I find this to be one of the best Muslimgauze releases so far - the songs are all distinct and yet the disc flows nicely from one track to the next.

review by Grievous
Noise From The Spleens Of Space

The following appeared on Concept.

You will succumb all over again to be greedily eaten by the hypnotic and shimmering sounds that whirl in the electronic resonance. Waves will roll over you to the rhythm of percussion clouds. You'll find yourself short of breath when the moments of restrained rage appear. Raised, you will find yourself in the shade of minarets, drowned in the crowd of a bazaar with the rumors and rancors of sound. The music of stones, traces of an eternal past, reveals itself.

review by Cyrille Sottile
translation by T @ The Edge with the use of Power Translator

The following appears on Amazon.com.

A great purchase for newcomers to Muslimgauze.

The great thing about this CD, aside from the quality of the music, is that it represents so many different styles of Muslimgauze music. For the uninitiated listener, this is a great introduction. "Dome of the Rock," perhaps the most sensual of all Muslimgauze songs, is a perfect example of the ambient stuff (cf. "Veiled Sisters" CD), while the title track and the short version of "Hebron Massacre" are great examples of Muslimgauze's quasi-industrial, heavier, and more violent work (cf. "Vote Hezbollah" CD). A few of the later tracks on this CD lose the drive and urgency of the first few, meandering into a style reminiscent of earlier releases. But regardless, you should buy this CD. Buy it now.

First-time listeners should also check out "Gun Aramaic." Furthermore, do your research and learn the histories, massacres, injustices, and splendors that have inspired the music.

A music fan (October 6, 1998)
Amazon.com

The following appears in All Music Guide.

One of Muslimgauze's more fiery releases, containing as it does a shortened but still potent mix of "Hebron Massacre" and with a fierce title to boot, Salaam continues Bryn Jones' remarkable abilities to use recurrent elements in ways that never fail to captivate, or at the very least provide a fine listening experience. The first title track, which leads off the album, shudders with energy, a fast-paced combination of electronic drums and keyboards, acoustic percussion, murmuring samples, and the bells that often recur as a dramatic hook for many of Muslimgauze's songs. It makes for a great start, a quality the album maintains throughout its length, though not all the tracks maintain that same level of intensity. "Haramzada" keeps things on the forward track, but at a midrange level. Neither dreamy nor explosive, it includes the same layering of drone keyboards which Jones often uses to create a strange, ominous feeling in the proceedings. Far more ambient in nature is "Mandarin Guerrilla"; despite the title and the random interjections of shouts, a heavily flanged keyboard line is center stage here, rising and falling over a low-key but increasingly complex series of rhythms. "Poona Eunuch," originally from Zealot, reappears here without change, presumably as a way to give fans a taste of that album once the aborted pressing sold out. One of the more un-remarked but still present elements of Muslimgauze's work surfaces here as well, namely his sometimes sharp and sometimes atrocious way around puns, as demonstrated by song titles like "Caste the First Stone" (a gentler number, with an intriguing string/dulcimer melody driving the piece) and "Cairopraktar" (a slow-growing but striking blend of various drums and percussion over a brooding keyboard line).

review by Ned Raggett
All Music Guide

The following appears on Review Index.com.

A great purchase for newcomers to Muslimgauze.

The great thing about this CD, aside from the quality of the music, is that it represents so many different styles of Muslimgauze music. For the uninitiated listener, this is a great introduction. "Dome of the Rock," perhaps the most sensual of all Muslimgauze songs, is a perfect example of the ambient stuff (cf. "Veiled Sisters" CD), while the title track and the short version of "Hebron Massacre" are great examples of Muslimgauze's quasi-industrial, heavier, and more violent work (cf. "Vote Hezbollah" CD). A few of the later tracks on this CD lose the drive and urgency of the first few, meandering into a style reminiscent of earlier releases. But regardless, you should buy this CD. Buy it now. Click the button and buy it.

Review Index

Kvitnu release date : May 15, 2020

It was not so long time ago in history of modern music, when influence of musicians on society was tectonic. When artist’s statement or position could impact the political situation in a country or sometimes even worldwide. When secret services like KGB, Mossad or CIA would consider some musicians as seriously dangerous for their agenda, because of artist’s influence on audience’s minds. When in some countries listening to forbidden bands could lead a person to appear in a concentration camp or even killed. When artist’s names would be an inspiration and a symbol of fight for freedom.

It was also a time when artists would not censor themselves and their position in fear of being obstructed and hunted by mob for political incorrectness. When artistic freedom to honestly express their subjective views, no matter how harsh or extremely reactive the form of expression could be, was more valuable than any possible concerns or fear to hurt anyone’s feelings. When hurting feelings would mean that provocation reached it’s goal. When idea of speaking out their subjective truth had the highest value for artists, as one of true meanings of art.

It was a time when music was not safe.

And for us Muslimgauze is definitely one of those artists, whose honesty was neither safe nor correctly comfortable, but still endlessly inspiring.

And the idea of “music as a weapon” became the keystone for this release’s cover artwork.

-

Dedicated to the invisible hands of revenge.

Press release from Kvitnu.

March 5, 2020: The novel coronavirus was rapidly spreading around the globe when an email arrived at Soleilmoon from Terry at Muslimgauze.org in Canada. He was forwarding me a message from a fellow named Zahir, inquiring about the possibility of licensing Muslimgauze's "Hamas Arc" for release as a limited edition cassette tape in Malaysia. I wrote back to Zahir the same day and proposed that he choose an album released by Soleilmoon, as the album he was interested was released by a different record label. I gave him a list of possible candidates, from which he chose "Salaam Alekum, Bastard". The only complicating factor was that this album had just been licensed to Kvitnu for release on CD and double LP, but Dmytro at Kvitnu graciously agreed to the proposal, asking only that the tape not be released until later in 2020 so as to leave the field clear for his editions of the album.

Time passed, the coronavirus upended everyone's lives, and it took more than two years for Zahir's dream to become a reality. But he was determined and persistent, and in late August, 2022, a bright yellow and red DHL box full of cassette tapes was delivered to Soleilmoon. Manufactured in an edition of 100 copies, with professionally printed inserts and tapes in sealed cases, this is first officially licensed Muslimgauze album to be released in Malaysia. The artwork is based on the 1995 Soleilmoon release, and was made using the original digital art files.

Release information from Soleilmoon

see also Infidel, Iran, Salaam Alekum, Bastard & Zul'm

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Salaam Alekum, Bastard Salaam Alekum, Bastard (CD re-issue) Salaam Alekum, Bastard (LP re-issue) Salaam Alekum, Bastard (digital re-issue) Salaam Alekum, Bastard (Cas re-issue)

September 1, 2022